It’s no secret that I’m more than slightly obsessed with London. I may have only lived there for six months but I go back whenever I can because it really does feel like my second home. As a struggling American student trying to survive a bad exchange rate, I relied on markets for many of my clothes and household items. Here are my favorite London markets worthy of the avant-garde traveler.

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Portobello Market

Go here for: Antiques

Don’t be deceived by its West London locale. Notting Hill may be one of the city’s most posh neighborhoods but all that is forgotten when it comes to their outdoor flea market. Portobello Market is mainly known for its impressive collection of antiques but you can also shop for fresh food and score some unbeatable deals on clothing. I walked away with £5 dresses on more than one occasion.

To get here, take the Tube to the Knotting Hill Gate stop, which runs on the District, Circle and Central lines. The antiques and bric-a-brac stalls are only open on Saturdays but otherwise, stop by any other day of the week beginning at 9am. Even if you don’t buy anything, Portobello Road is one of the prettiest and most famous streets in London so there’s no wrong way to spend your day here.

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Spitalfields Market

Go here for: Fashion & Food 

If you are on the hunt for some serious fashion finds or just in the mood to sample cuisine from different cultures, Spitalfields will become your go-to London market. The market is open daily and they recently launched the “Saturday Style Market” featuring independent designers, award-winning eateries and art that you can actually afford. It all happens from 11-5pm and there are often free events going on as well.

To reach Spitalfields, take the Tube to Liverpool Street Station on the Central, Hammersmith and City, District, Circle and Metroplitan lines. Their official website is pretty informative and a good resource for staying up to date on live performances and special events. Before your leave the area, wander down Brick Lane, grab a bite of Indian food and get lost in the cultural East End.

Camden Market 

Go here for: Grunge & Graphics

This market has been around since 1975 and its easily one of London’s most popular attractions, attracting more than 150,000 people each week. If you are planning to see a similar scene to that of Portobello, think again. Nothing about the Camden neighborhood is normal, and that’s exactly how it should be. Be prepared for a more alternative crowd looking for everything from punk clothes and earrings to second-hand books and clothing.

Take the Northern line to either Camden Town or Chalk Farm Road stations. The weekends are especially crowded but there are plenty of quirky pubs and restaurants to slip into if you need a break from the crowd. If you want a stark contrast to Camden, travel via the Chalk Farm station and spend a few minutes, or even an entire afternoon, walking around the residential area of Primrose Hill.

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Columbia Road Market 

Go here for: Flowers & Mulled Wine

Depending on when you visit the Columbia Road Market, you’ll either get colorful flowers or mulled wine. That’s of course because of the seasons but it gives you two totally different local experiences. The market is open every Sunday rain or shine from 8am to around 3pm. Many of the sellers plant their own flowers while others import their flowers from around the world.

There are 60 independent shops in addition to small art galleries, vintage clothing stores, antique stores and gardens in the nearby streets. Also in the area are pubs, restaurants and cozy cafes. During the wintertime in the evenings, the main focus shifts toward art, with musicians performing and lots of mulled wine available. Take the Tube to either the Old Street or Bethnal Green stations to reach Columbia Road.

Covent Garden Market

Go here for: the view

In my opinion, there’s nothing exceptionally special about the Covent Garden market but the neighborhood itself is a true gem. The 19th century Piazza building transforms into a bustling market of vendors selling handcrafts ranging from soap to hand-knitted clothing. On Mondays, the market sells antiques but while Tuesday through Fridays is dedicated to clothing and items for the home.

Once the weekend comes around, it’s all about the arts and crafts. You’ll also likely spot at least one street performer since the area is so close to Leicester Square. Get off the Tube at the Covent Garden stop or one of the nearby stations. Enjoy a stroll through the cobblestoned streets, grab a beer, and sightsee while you take in your new surroundings.

More London Markets to Discover:

*Alfies Antique Market for vintage clothes and 20th century design pieces
*Borough Market for lunch of gourmet grocery shopping
*Brick Lane Market for a little bit of everything

What is your favorite London market? Tell me in the comments below! 

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